Day 1

Puppy Dog Show

 

 

Digital Camera Features
Parts of a Digital Camera
Flash Shutter Button Zoom Controls Tripod Receptacle
Lens Flash Button Batteries LCD Screen
View Finder (?) Media Storage DC IN Outlet AV Connections

Power Switch

More About Storage

  • Storage is very important. You don't want to be involved in a wonderful project with your students and have to keep running to your desk to download pictures. I suggest purchasing the largest possible storage device for your camera.

Here's a chart showing the number of pictures possible from a storage source when the camera is set at its highest quality setting.

The amount of memory on the card
Maximum number of highest resolution images (best quality)
8MB
6
16MB
12
32MB

24

64MB
48
128MB
96

In all reality, you will seldomly use your camera at its highest setting. This setting creates a picture that is usually too large for anything done in a classroom.

Camera Settings

Here is where it is very important to read your camera's manual. Not all cameras have the same features or require the same settings.

  • Setting the Light Exposure - Speaking from personal experiences, this is an important feature when your outside spirit day assembly is held under the PE shelter and the sun is to the back of the stage area. Adjusting the exposure is also important when taking pictures of our African American students.
  • Setting the Image Size or Resolution - The image size or resolution settings on a camera should be set to match the purpose of the pictures. For example, a resolution of 600 x 1000 may be good for 3 x 5 photographs, but not good for 8 x 10 photographs.
Resolution Settings
Pixel Size
Megapixel Equivalent
Ideal Print Size
700 x 400 Less than one megapixel Wallet Size
600 x 1000 Less than one megapixel 3 x 5
800 x 1200 One megapixel 4 x 6
1600 x 2000 Three Megapixels 8 x 10
2200 x 3400 Six Megapixels 11 x 17
  • Red Eye - Setting the Red Eye feature causes the flash to strobe and reduce the red eye effect.
  • Flash - The Auto setting is usually best. Forced Flash flashes every picture regardless of the light around the subject. There is also a way to turn the flash off.
Taking Better Pictures

How to Take Better Pictures

  • Use the rule of thirds.Imagine your view finder as a tic-tac-toe grid. Try to place the focus of the picture where the lines intersect. This makes the picture a bit more exciting.

  • Get close enough to fill your scene with the subject.
  • Try to find lines such as roads or shorelines to direct the viewer's eyes through the picture.
  • Watch the background to avoid having a plant coming out of someone's head or other unwanted items in strange places.
  • Shoot from unexpected angles. Not everything needs to be shot straight on.
  • Hold the camera still. Try keeping your elbows against your sides.Use a tripod. Set the camera on a table and use the automatic timer. Squeeze the button and don't jab.

Taking Better Pictures Using Your Camera Settings

  1. Setting the Exposure -Letting More Light into the Camera
  2. Backlighting -Adjusts Lighting in the Background
  3. Setting The Flash - Adds light to the subject of the Picture
  4. Setting the Resolution - How many pixels make up the picture

Taking Great Pictures - Read Kodak's "Ten Tips for Taking Great Pictures"

 

Basics of Photoshop Elements
  1. PLACE ALL OF YOUR PICTURES IN ONE FOLDER.
  2. DUPLICATE THIS FOLDER.
  3. ONLY EDIT THE PICTURES IN YOUR DUPLICATE FOLDER AND LEAVE THE ORIGINALS UNTOUCHED.

To open a picture - 2 Methods

  • File > Open > navigate to the picture you wish to open.
  • File > Browse > find the picture

To Rotate an Image

  • Image > Rotate > select how you wish to rotate the picture

Enhance the Quality of a Picture

  • Enhance > Auto Levels or Auto Contrast

To Crop an Image

  • Select the Crop tool > Mark area to be cropped > Image > Crop

To Resize an Image

  • Image > Resize > Image Size insert the new dimensions of the picture using pixels or percent

To Save an Image for the Web ( I usually use "Save for Web"... however, you can also use "Save As.")

  • File > Save for Web
    • You are now looking at 2 views of the same picture. The first picture is the original. The second picuture is the optimized view. The optimized view has a reduced quality, but is usually not all that noticable. The menu on the side can be altered. The only part I've used is to resize the picture. You do not need to change any of the setting on this menu at this time.
  • Click OK.
  • Name the picture.
    • MAKE SURE YOU KEEP THE FILE EXTENSION. THIS IS THE INFORMATION THAT FOLLOWS THE PERIOD. (.jpg, .gif, .tiff,)
  • Decide where you are going to save the picture so that you can find it later.
  • Click Save.

Things to Bring for Day 2
  • Bring in 25 RAW images to edit tomorrow.